The Art of War Quotes

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51qzw1zjitl-_sx331_bo1204203200_The Art of War is a very short read, filled with legendary Chinese general Sun Tzu’s various military -isms ranging from the very specific to what can be considered life’s great wisdoms.

To be honest, many points went right over my head since my mind was definitely not in the state of trying to command an army and win battles. But some other points were sufficiently clear to my civilian self. Here are my top highlights. (The full text is free for the Kindle and ready to read right here.)

  • All warfare is based on deception.
  • Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.
  • Thus the highest form of generalship is to balk the enemy’s plans; the next best is to prevent the junction of the enemy’s forces; the next in order is to attack the enemy’s army in the field; and the worst policy of all is to besiege walled cities.
  • Thus we may know that there are five essentials for victory: (1) He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight. (2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces. (3) He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks. (4) He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared. (5) He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.
  • If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.
  • To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.
  • The control of a large force is the same principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers.
  • Whoever is first in the field and awaits the coming of the enemy, will be fresh for the fight; whoever is second in the field and has to hasten to battle will arrive exhausted.
  •  Therefore the clever combatant imposes his will on the enemy, but does not allow the enemy’s will to be imposed on him.
  • Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.
  • Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.
  • Therefore, just as water retains no constant shape, so in warfare there are no constant conditions.
  •  The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy’s not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable.
  • There are five dangerous faults which may affect a general: (1) Recklessness, which leads to destruction; (2) cowardice, which leads to capture; (3) a hasty temper, which can be provoked by insults; (4) a delicacy of honor which is sensitive to shame; (5) over-solicitude for his men, which exposes him to worry and trouble.
  • When an army feeds its horses with grain and kills its cattle for food, and when the men do not hang their cooking-pots over the camp-fires, showing that they will not return to their tents, you may know that they are determined to fight to the death.
  • If soldiers are punished before they have grown attached to you, they will not prove submissive; and, unless submissive, then will be practically useless. If, when the soldiers have become attached to you, punishments are not enforced, they will still be unless.
  • If a general shows confidence in his men but always insists on his orders being obeyed, the gain will be mutual.

 

 

 

 

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